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Red Power Nationally and Internationally

Seven Generations 2020

The Indians of All Tribes’ 1969 takeover of Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay launched militant Red Power into the national spotlight. Leveraging the wider media attention through takeovers and occupations of Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) buildings, AIM became the most well-known Red Power organization, eclipsing the National Indian Youth Council’s (NIYC) role in the Red Power Movement.

Unlike the NIYC, which was founded by college-educated students, the spirit of AIM arose from urban ghettos. Its founders first met and conceived of AIM while incarcerated at Stillwater Prison after organizing for the religious and cultural rights of incarcerated Native people. Both NIYC and AIM adhered to direct action to achieve their aims. AIM, in contrast, emphasized more the militancy of the urban and reservation Native underclass than their counterparts, embracing, at times, a pan-Indigenous identity as the basis of unity versus emphasizing cultural distinctions.

AIM and the NIYC went on to champion Indigenous rights and decolonization before the United Nations in solidarity with Indigenous peoples across the globe. In 1977, its international arm, the International Indian Treaty Council, called upon the UN to end the celebration of Columbus Day and declare the International Day of Solidarity and Mourning with Indigenous Peoples. The work culminated in the touchstone Indigenous rights document, the 2007 UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

AIM remains active in some cities and states—including New Mexico—and following the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis in 2020, AIM reinstated its patrols.

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Seven Generations 2020

Seven Generations 2020

Seven Generations 2020

Seven Generations 2020



Seven Generations 2020

Seven Generations 2020

Seven Generations 2020