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Anthony Louderbough, University of New Mexico Students Give Black Power Salute during the US National Anthem

Seven Generations 2020

Anthony Louderbough
born 1947; lives Albuquerque, New Mexico
University of New Mexico Students Give Black Power Salute during the US National Anthem
ca. 1968
gelatin silver print
8 x 10 in.
Anthony Louderbough Pictorial Collection PICT 000-954(2)-0008, Center for Southwest Research, University of New Mexico

When Stokely Carmichael—now known as Kwame Ture—first used the phrase “Black Power” in 1966, Clyde Warrior (Ponca) was listening. Carmichael’s vision of Black Power involved African Americans recognizing their shared heritage and uniting as a community with a common identity. The two movements developed alongside each other in the 1960s, but Warrior’s Red Power was more about embracing cultural differences between nations and reclaiming tribal authority over decisions affecting their communities.

Much like saying “Black lives matter,” “Black Power” is a broader vision for freedom. Red Power and Black Power advocate for self-determination for Indigenous and Black people who have historically been denied it. They realize that theirs is a common fight for liberation. In this photo, Indigenous and Black students unite in protest.