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Shared Histories of Colonization

Seven Generations 2020

The shared struggles of Indigenous, Black, and Latinx/Chicanx people extended beyond North America. In 1977, the International Indian Treaty Council, the international arm of the American Indian Movement (AIM), called for an end of the celebration of Columbus Day and declared instead the International Day of Solidarity and Mourning with Indigenous Peoples. The UN Committee on Racism, Racial Discrimination, Apartheid, and Colonialism passed the resolution with the support of many organizations, such as the African National Congress and the Palestine Liberation Organization. These two groups recognized that the devastating legacies of European colonialism and African slavery had to be addressed.

In 1982, Spain and the Vatican proposed a 500-year commemoration of Columbus’s voyage at the UN General Assembly. The entire African delegation to the UN, in solidarity with Indigenous peoples of the Americas, walked out of the meeting in protest of celebrating colonialism. The commemoration was crushed, and the UN declared a celebration of the World’s Indigenous Peoples Day and the Decade for the World’s Indigenous Peoples, which began in 1994. The second Decade was declared in 2005, and the UN adopted the Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007. The declaration has since become a touchstone document used to uphold and defend Indigenous rights.

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Seven Generations 2020

Seven Generations 2020

Seven Generations 2020

Seven Generations 2020

Seven Generations 2020

Seven Generations 2020

Seven Generations 2020

Seven Generations 2020

Seven Generations 2020