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Metropolitan Medical Response System

The MMRS program is an ongoing effort by the public health and safety community in the City of Albuquerque to plan for emergencies.

In 1996, the national Metropolitan Medical Response System (MMRS) was initiated by the Department of Health and Human Services. It started with a couple of major cities and in 1997 twenty-five more were added, with twenty more in 1999 and another twenty-five in 2000.

The Purpose of this act was to ensure communities were prepared and developed capabilities to address bioterrorism through the use of biological or chemical warfare tactics. The response capabilities for the medical and healthcare facilities were developed and are defined through the MMRS Program.

The MMRS program is an ongoing effort by the public health and safety community in the City of Albuquerque to plan for serious health and medical catastrophes, to develop systems for coordinating and providing critical care where it is needed, and to purchase medicine and equipment when needed. The primary focus of the MMRS program is to develop and enhance existing emergency preparedness systems to effectively respond to a public health crisis (i.e., an anthrax attack or pandemic breakout). Through preparation and coordination with local law enforcement, fire, hazmat, EMS, hospital, public health, and other first response personnel we can all respond more effectively.

In 1999, the City of Albuquerque began its development and implementation of a Metropolitan Medical Response System (MMRS). The program was transferred to the Environmental Health Department on September 30, 2003 and then to the Office of Emergency Management in 2008. The City of Albuquerque MMRS program is currently funded by grants from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to coordinate preparedness for emergency medical response in the city.

A .jpg of the Metropolitan Medical Response System Logo.

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