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Mayor Richard J. Berry and Police Chief Raymond D. Schultz Introduce New Police Academy Director

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ICE executive to lead APD’s training academy

July 19, 2012

Albuquerque— Mayor Richard J. Berry and Police Chief Raymond D. Schultz introduced Joseph T. Wolf Thursday as the Albuquerque Police Department’s first-ever civilian training director.

Wolf, 56, is currently Chief of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Training Academy in Glynco, Georgia where he was responsible for the curriculum development and training for one of the nation’s largest law enforcement academies.

"We are looking forward to having one the nation’s premier law enforcement training executives join our team to take our training and education initiatives to an even higher level and to help build the next generation of leaders within APD." Mayor Berry said. "Mr. Wolf brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to our police department, its officers and the city.”

In January, Mayor Berry announced several significant changes to the police academy. The Mayor raised the selection standards for new cadets to require college education and/or military experience and created a civilian training director position. Since then, the Police Department has conducted a nationwide search and Wolf was selected from more than 70 applicants. Previously, the academy has been managed by a sworn law enforcement officer from within the department.  Under Mr. Wolf, sworn officers will still play a key role in the administration and training functions of the academy.

"We had a lot of outstanding candidates apply for this position," Chief Schultz said. "It’s going to be an honor to work with Mr. Wolf as we continue to improve the quality of training we provide our officers."

A native of New Jersey, Mr. Wolf began his federal law enforcement 1979 as a Special Agent with the Coast Guard Investigative Service (then known as Coast Guard Intelligence).  Mr. Wolf was hired as a US Customs Special Agent in Deming in 1988.   He was soon reassigned to Laredo, TX.  In 1991, he was assigned as a resident agent for the U.S. Customs Service’s field office in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. As a resident agent, he orchestrated a special operation that resulted in 40 arrests of suspects connected to marijuana smuggling and distribution. He also organized numerous international financial investigations of criminals including those from Malaysia and the former Soviet Union. Mr. Wolf was also assigned to Customs’ International Affairs Division where he was the area director for investigations in Europe and Africa. Mr. Wolf spent two years as the Assistant Customs Attaché in London where he originated and governed OPERATION CHARING CROSS, an international investigation designed to tackle child exploitation and pornography cases.

Mr. Wolf has spent the past seven years of his law enforcement career training future ICE agents. In his time at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Glynco he oversaw the training of more than 3,000 ICE agents and officers annually. He also developed new policy and procedures and revised the agency’s misconduct investigation guidebook

Prior to becoming a Customs special agent, Mr. Wolf spent 14 years in active service for the United States Coast Guard. Mr. Wolf is married, has two teenaged children and spends his free time riding motorcycles and golfing. Mr. Wolf will begin his new assignment at the Roger A. Hoisington Jr. Training Academy on July 30.

"I will work diligently to have a positive impact on the department and the community," Mr. Wolf said. "I am really impressed with the vision and commitment to this department by Mayor Berry and Chief Schultz. They have demonstrated a desire for enhanced, state of the art police training in Albuquerque and I believe I can get them where they want to go."

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