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Albuquerque Participates in National Maker Week

Several activities planned focused on STEM education

 Albuquerque is participating again this year in the White House Maker Faire initiative from June 12-18, as community labs and STEM-related activities pop up for Maker Week.
The week will introduce the community to the importance of collaboration, entrepreneurism and STEM education to our local and national economies. People of all ages and backgrounds are invited to get involved in makerspaces and special events focused on everything from 3D printing, robots, gaming, coding, and digital art and electronic art, to crafting and design.
“We are excited to lead the City in this national effort,” said Mayor Richard J. Berry. “This week provides an opportunity for people who may not have had access to STEM education before to build and expand our economy through entrepreneurship.”
Makerspaces are akin to a community lab in that they provide a venue and sometimes equipment – usually free – for people to build, socialize, present, collaborate and educate. Often, entrepreneurs are born from them.
Maker Week started June 18, 2014, when President Obama hosted the first-ever White House Maker Faire and issued a call to action: “Every company, every college, every community, every citizen joins us as we lift up makers and builders and doers across the country”. By democratizing the tools and skills necessary to design and make just about anything, Maker-related events and activities can inspire more people to pursue careers in design, advanced manufacturing, and the related fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and possibly take their creations to the next level and become entrepreneurs, according to a White House news release.
“Makerspaces can provide children and adults with the tools and resources necessary for them to create,” said Gary Oppedahl, director of the City of Albuquerque Economic Development Department. “They are an innovative, grass roots way to help rejuvenate the economy.”
Local participants to date are Quelab; National Hispanic Cultural Center; Girl Scouts of New Mexico Trails; CNM STEMulus Center; UNM Health Sciences; Intel; Ole'; and Explora.
Maker Week Albuquerque begins with a free showing of the movie “Maker” from 7-9 p.m. June 12 at the Epicenter, 101 Broadway NE. The feature-length documentary depicts the Maker Movement and its impact on society, culture and the economy in the United States.
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Events scheduled for the week include:
June 13, 10 a.m.-noon: QueLab, a nonprofit makerspace and hackerspace, presents CoderDojo, a free, volunteer-led coding club for youth ages 7 - 17 at 680 Haines Ave. NW. Youth of any skill level are welcome to attend to learn how to code, build games and web pages, and increase their computer literacy.
June 14, 7-10 p.m.: QueLab presents Hacknight at 680 Haines Ave NW. Anyone is welcome to work/start/help on projects, learn new skills, and trade ideas/parts/code. Cost is $5.
June 8-12: Girl Scouts of New Mexico Trails presents “Designing Your World: I’m a Graphic Designer” during Innovate & Create Camp. (Registration is closed.)
Young women in grades 6 - 12 will explore the intersections of art, design and technology. They will have the opportunity to learn photography, poster and publication design, computer programming and 3-D printing. The first of three summer sessions occurs during the end of Maker Week. Other sessions focus on video game design/website programming and 3D printing.
June 12-14: UNM Health Sciences Center, Office for Diversity, presents STEAM-H Career Exploration Extravaganza Weekend (Registration is closed.)
Ongoing: The Rail Yards offers two areas for Makers to show what they make and share how to make things. Anyone interested should send an email to [email protected]

The White House Office of Science & Technology suggests:
• Individuals can volunteer to mentor and share their skills by hosting workshops or classes in areas of their community that have fewer opportunities for designing, developing, and prototyping projects.
• K-12 school districts can create opportunities for interactive, hands-on STEM learning in and outside of the classroom. Schools can also establish maker spaces to empower students to design and build, and solve real-world problems.
• Colleges and universities can establish on-campus spaces that are accessible to students, faculty and the broader local community to tinker, design, build, and invent. They can share best practices with other educational institutions through networks and communities of practice.
• Companies can encourage making in their community through design and engineering and help designers, inventors, and other aspiring entrepreneurs create American jobs by navigating the transition from prototyping to manufacturing.
• Mayors can join the Mayors Maker Challenge and encourage companies, foundations, non-profits, schools, libraries, and museums to get involved with product development and manufacturing. Local leaders can also back initiatives that make it easier for entrepreneurs to manufacture their products locally.

Albuquerque- Albuquerque is participating again this year in the White House Maker Faire initiative from June 12-18, as community labs and STEM-related activities pop up for Maker Week.
The week will introduce the community to the importance of collaboration, entrepreneurism and STEM education to our local and national economies. People of all ages and backgrounds are invited to get involved in makerspaces and special events focused on everything from 3D printing, robots, gaming, coding, and digital art and electronic art, to crafting and design.
“We are excited to lead the City in this national effort,” said Mayor Richard J. Berry. “This week provides an opportunity for people who may not have had access to STEM education before to build and expand our economy through entrepreneurship.”
Makerspaces are akin to a community lab in that they provide a venue and sometimes equipment – usually free – for people to build, socialize, present, collaborate and educate. Often, entrepreneurs are born from them.
Maker Week started June 18, 2014, when President Obama hosted the first-ever White House Maker Faire and issued a call to action: “Every company, every college, every community, every citizen joins us as we lift up makers and builders and doers across the country”. By democratizing the tools and skills necessary to design and make just about anything, Maker-related events and activities can inspire more people to pursue careers in design, advanced manufacturing, and the related fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and possibly take their creations to the next level and become entrepreneurs, according to a White House news release.
“Makerspaces can provide children and adults with the tools and resources necessary for them to create,” said Gary Oppedahl, director of the City of Albuquerque Economic Development Department. “They are an innovative, grass roots way to help rejuvenate the economy.”
Local participants to date are Quelab; National Hispanic Cultural Center; Girl Scouts of New Mexico Trails; CNM STEMulus Center; UNM Health Sciences; Intel; Ole'; and Explora.
Maker Week Albuquerque begins with a free showing of the movie “Maker” from 7-9 p.m. June 12 at the Epicenter, 101 Broadway NE. The feature-length documentary depicts the Maker Movement and its impact on society, culture and the economy in the United States.
###


Events scheduled for the week include:
June 13, 10 a.m.-noon: QueLab, a nonprofit makerspace and hackerspace, presents CoderDojo, a free, volunteer-led coding club for youth ages 7 - 17 at 680 Haines Ave. NW. Youth of any skill level are welcome to attend to learn how to code, build games and web pages, and increase their computer literacy.
June 14, 7-10 p.m.: QueLab presents Hacknight at 680 Haines Ave NW. Anyone is welcome to work/start/help on projects, learn new skills, and trade ideas/parts/code. Cost is $5.
June 8-12: Girl Scouts of New Mexico Trails presents “Designing Your World: I’m a Graphic Designer” during Innovate & Create Camp. (Registration is closed.)
Young women in grades 6 - 12 will explore the intersections of art, design and technology. They will have the opportunity to learn photography, poster and publication design, computer programming and 3-D printing. The first of three summer sessions occurs during the end of Maker Week. Other sessions focus on video game design/website programming and 3D printing.
June 12-14: UNM Health Sciences Center, Office for Diversity, presents STEAM-H Career Exploration Extravaganza Weekend (Registration is closed.)
Ongoing: The Rail Yards offers two areas for Makers to show what they make and share how to make things. Anyone interested should send an email to [email protected]

The White House Office of Science & Technology suggests:
• Individuals can volunteer to mentor and share their skills by hosting workshops or classes in areas of their community that have fewer opportunities for designing, developing, and prototyping projects.
• K-12 school districts can create opportunities for interactive, hands-on STEM learning in and outside of the classroom. Schools can also establish maker spaces to empower students to design and build, and solve real-world problems.
• Colleges and universities can establish on-campus spaces that are accessible to students, faculty and the broader local community to tinker, design, build, and invent. They can share best practices with other educational institutions through networks and communities of practice.
• Companies can encourage making in their community through design and engineering and help designers, inventors, and other aspiring entrepreneurs create American jobs by navigating the transition from prototyping to manufacturing.
• Mayors can join the Mayors Maker Challenge and encourage companies, foundations, non-profits, schools, libraries, and museums to get involved with product development and manufacturing. Local leaders can also back initiatives that make it easier for entrepreneurs to manufacture their products locally.