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Visit One of Many Public Facilities to Cool Down during Albuquerque’s Heat Wave.

The City of Albuquerque has multiple Departments that provide opportunities to stay cool during the summer months. The Department of Family and Community Services encourages individuals to cool-off and avoid the heat by visiting a community center. Community Centers provide an air-conditioned environment as well as fitness rooms, computer labs, gymnasiums, game rooms and offer a safe alternative to outdoor exercise during the recent rise in temperatures.

The City offers a multitude of air-conditioned locations for those seeking refuge from the increased heat. Locations include:

To prevent heat exhaustion the Mayo Clinic recommends:

  • Wear loose fitting, lightweight clothing. Wearing excess clothing or clothing that fits tightly won't allow your body to cool properly.
  • Protect against sunburn. Sunburn affects your body's ability to cool itself, so protect yourself outdoors with a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses and use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. Apply sunscreen generously, and reapply every two hours — or more often if you're swimming or sweating.
  • Drink plenty of fluids. Staying hydrated will help your body sweat and maintain a normal body temperature.
  • Take extra precautions with certain medications. Be on the lookout for heat-related problems if you take medications that can affect your body's ability to stay hydrated and dissipate heat.
  • Never leave anyone in a parked car.This is a common cause of heat-related deaths in children. When parked in the sun, the temperature in your car can rise 20 degrees Fahrenheit (more than 6.7 C) in 10 minutes.
  • Take it easy during the hottest parts of the day. If you can't avoid strenuous activity in hot weather, drink fluids and rest frequently in a cool spot. Try to schedule exercise or physical labor for cooler parts of the day, such as early morning or evening.
  • Get acclimated. Limit time spent working or exercising in heat until you're conditioned to it.
  • Be cautious if you're at increased risk. If you take medications or have a condition that increases your risk of heat-related problems, such as a history of previous heat illness, avoid the heat and act quickly if you notice symptoms of overheating.