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Household Hazardous Waste

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Get more information about disposing of hazardous waste.

How do I dispose of Hazardous Waste?

Household Hazardous Waste Collection Center

Residents of the City of Albuquerque and Bernalillo County may bring residential hazardous wastes to the Household Hazardous Waste Collection Center (HHWCC). The HHWCC is operated under contract by:

ACT (Advanced Chemical Transport) formerly Rinchem Company, Inc.  
6137 Edith Blvd NE (on west side of Edith between Montano and Osuna) Google Map

Household Hazardous Waste Hotline: 505-349-5220

Open to the Public on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM and Saturday 8 AM – 3 PM

The Household Hazardous Waste Center will be closed on Thursday, November 28th and Friday, November, 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving Holiday.  The Center will reopen on Saturday, November 30th.

What are Household Hazardous Wastes?

Household wastes which can burn easily (flammable), corrode or irritate skin (corrosive), generate heat or explode (reactive), or poison humans and animals (toxic) are examples of household hazardous wastes.

Items such as paints, fertilizers, cleaners, insecticides, pool chemicals, used motor oil, and automobile batteries may be brought into the HHWCC.

The Household Hazardous Waste Collection Center cannot accept:

  • Explosives or ammunition
  • Compressed gases
  • Radioactive waste
  • Biomedical waste
  • Business generated waste
  • Non-hazardous waste

The Household Hazardous Waste Collection Center also offers a material reuse area where usable materials brought to the Center for disposal are offered to the public free of charge.

Click here for additional locations to dispose of used oil / Antifreeze

Click here for Local companies that will accept 20-pound (barbeque type) and larger refillable Propane Cylinders for disposal (as of November 2011) (Unfortunately, residential recycling programs for 16 oz Coleman-type propane cylinders are not yet available. Please visit Coleman  for instructions on disposal options).

Click Here For Local for Companies that recycle ni-cad batteries  Or call 1-800-8-Battery.

For more information contact the Household Hazardous Waste line at (505) 349-5220 or the Albuquerque Environmental Health Department at (505) 768-2738.

Fluorescent Light Bulb Disposal

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Are fluorescent light bulbs dangerous?

Yes, fluorescent light bulbs contain mercury vapor that is used to produce the light.  Light bulbs containing mercury can be dangerous to your health and the environment, and should not be thrown in the trash.

How can I properly dispose of fluorescent bulbs?

The City of Albuquerque Environmental Health Department recommends that fluorescent bulbs be disposed of the following ways:

Fluorescent bulbs from households can be taken to:

ACT(Advanced Chemical Transport), Google Map
6137 Edith Blvd NE

Open to the Public on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM and Saturday 8 AM – 3 PM

Call 505-349-5220 for more information

This service is provided for households located within the City of Albuquerque or Bernalillo County.

Fluorescent Bulbs from businesses, non-profits, etc, are handled different from household waste. Contact the State of New Mexico Hazardous Waste Bureau for more information.

Find more local recycling resources and facilities at Earth 911.com

Where can I get more information?

New Mexico Environment Department – Solid Waste Bureau
New Mexico Environment Department – Hazardous Waste Bureau (Fact Sheet)
US EPA: Information on Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs
US EPA: Mercury in Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs)

Automotive Waste

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[Printable PDF]

MaterialMay Be Reused or RecycledMay Be Poured Down the DrainMay Be Places in Trash for LandfillDeposit at HHWC
antifreeze* X X
automotive transmission fluid X X
batteries (car and boat) X X
brake fluid X X
carburetor cleaner X
degreasing chemicals X
diesel fuel X X
enamels X2 X
gasoline X
kerosene X X
light lubricating oil X X
motor oil* X
polish and wax X2 X
windshield washer fluid X1

Notes

  1. Pour small amounts down drain with plenty of water; rinse containers thoroughly before discarding.
  2. Solidify with absorbent material before placing in trash.

*The City coordinates an active used oil and antifreeze recycling program through a partnership with approximately 60 businesses in Albuquerque Metropolitan Area. Residents are asked to bring their clean, used motor oil or antifreeze to one of the drop off locations in clear clean containers. For additional information call (505) 768-2738. Find a site near you that will accept your used oil or antifreeze.

Hobby and Workshop Waste

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[Printable PDF]

MaterialMay Be Reused or RecycledMay Be Poured Down the DrainMay Be Placed in Trash for LandfillDeposit at HHWC
Artist Oils and Acrylics X
Chemistry Sets X
Gun Cleaning Solvents X
Photo Chemicals X1 X
Flashlights and Toy Batteries X
Oil Based Paints X
Primers, Rusts, Stains, Varnishes X
Wood Preservatives X
Latex Paints X2 X
Paint Thinner X
Turpentine X
Paintbrush Cleaner (phosphate based) X1
Paintbrush Cleaner (solvent based) X
Paint, Varnish, Stripper (lye based) X1
Paint, Varnish, Stripper (solvent based) X

Notes

  1. Pour small amounts down drain with plenty of water; rinse containers thoroughly before discarding. Do not dispose of in septic tank.
  2. evaporate contents before discarding; solidify with absorbent material before placing in trash.

Home Care and Maintenance Waste

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[Printable PDF]

MaterialMay Be Reused or RecycledMay Be Poured Down the DrainMay Be Placed in Trash for LandfillDeposit HHWC
Basin, Tub, Tile, Window Cleaners X1
Bleach X1,2
Toilet Bowl Disinfectants X1
Dry Cleaning Fluid, Spot Remover X
Glue (solvent based) X3 X
Glue (water based) X3
Mothballs X
Upholstery Cleaner (detergent based) X1
Upholstery Cleaner (solvent based) X
Copper, Silver Polish X3,4
Floor, Furniture Polish X
Rust Remover X X
Light Bulbs, Tubes X
Flea Collars X
Fertilizer X
Fungicides, Insecticides, Rat Poison X
Roach Killer X
Weed Killer X
Empty Containers X

Notes

  1. Pour small amounts down drain with plenty of water; rinse containers thoroughly before discarding.
  2. Do not dispose of in septic tank.
  3. Solidify with absorbent material before placing in trash.
  4. Evaporate contents before discarding.
  5. Wrap in newspaper or plastic before discarding.

Personal Care Waste

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[Printable PDF]

MaterialMay Be Reused or RecycledMay Be Poured Down the DrainMay Be Placed in Trash for LandfillDeposit at HHWC
Cosmetics X
Hair Permanent X1
Head Lice Shampoo X1
Medicine (liquid) X2
Medicine (non liquid) X3
Antibiotics X3
Nail Polish X2
Nail Polish Remover X2 X
Perfume/Shaving Lotion X1
Rubbing Alcohol X1
Shoe Polish X
Hearing Aid Batteries X

Notes

  1. Pour small amounts down drain with plenty of water; rinse containers thoroughly before discarding.
  2. Solidify with absorbent material before discarding.
  3. Keep in original container; can add cooking oil or water to solid drugs before recapping. Double bag, then put in trash.

Cleaning Up Spilled Mercury in the Home

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Why is Safe Cleanup Important?

Mercury is toxic to many organ systems, including the central nervous system. If mercury gets into the blood stream, it can damage the brain, spinal cord, kidneys and liver. Children and fetuses are at highest risk if exposed to mercury.  When a thermometer or other mercury-containing device is broken, the spilled mercury forms droplets that accumulate in small pools and in the tiniest of spaces, making cleanup difficult. Even though liquid mercury evaporates slowly, a significant amount of mercury vapor can build up in indoor air at room temperature after some mercury has been spilled.

What To Do Immediately After a Mercury Spill?

Call a poison control center if someone has inhaled mercury vapors

  • Call 911 or the Poison Control Center at, 800-222-1222 from anywhere in the state.
  • If you suspect a pet has been exposed to mercury, call your veterinarian.

Isolate the spill and ventilate the area

  • Keep all people and pets away from the spill area.
  • Immediately open windows and exterior doors.
  • Close all doors between the room where the mercury was spilled and the rest of the house.
  • Close all cold air returns so that mercury vapor is not carried throughout the house.
  • Turn down heaters and turn up room air conditioners. Do not use central air conditioning.
  • Turn off fans unless they vent to the outdoors.
  • Use fans to blow mercury-contaminated air outside.

Remove mercury from shoes, clothing, and skin

  • If mercury has touched your skin, shoes, or clothing, stay still and have someone bring you a plastic trash bag and wet paper towels.
  • Wipe off visible beads of mercury with wet paper towels and put them into the trash bag. Check your shirt pockets for mercury drops.
  • Remove contaminated shoes and clothing and place them in the trash bag. Seal the bag.
  • Dispose of clothing properly and shower well.

Decide if you will try to clean up the spilled mercury

  • The other option is to hire an environmental contractor.

What Not To Do After a Spill

Never allow people who are wearing mercury contaminated shoes or clothing to walk around the house

  • This will help prevent the spread of spilled mercury.

Never use an ordinary vacuum cleaner or a shop vacuum to clean up mercury

  • The vacuum cleaner can heat up the mercury and cause it to become an airborne mercury vapor and may continue to release hazardous vapor for a long time.(See the advice in the next section if you’ve already tried to vacuum up the mercury spill.)

Never use a broom to clean up mercury

  • The mercury will break into smaller drops and will spread around more. The small droplets evaporate faster and are more difficult to clean up.

Never pour mercury down a drain

  • The mercury can become lodged in pipes and can pollute septic tanks or wastewater- treatment plants.

Never launder mercury-contaminated clothing in a washing machine

  • Washing mercury-contaminated clothing in a washing machine can contaminate the washer.
  • Dispose of mercury-contaminated clothing in the trash, or if it is visibly contaminated, take it to a household hazardous waste collection site.

What If You’ve Already Vacuumed Up the Spill?

If you’ve already tried to vacuum up spilled mercury, you’ve probably contaminated your machine. You can either discard your vacuum cleaner or try to clean it out in one of the following manners:

If your vacuum uses bags:

With the same bag in place that was used when you tried to vacuum up the spilled mercury, run the machine outdoors for an hour or more. Then, change the bag. Seal the mercury-contaminated bag inside a plastic bag, place it in another plastic bag, seal again, and label the outer bag Mercury Waste: Hazardous.

If your vacuum does not use bags:

Run the machine outdoors for an hour or more. Then carefully transfer any debris in the trap into a plastic bag and package and label the same as   for a mercury-contaminated bag (as described in the previous paragraph).

Can You Clean Up the Spill Yourself?

You may be able to clean up a mercury spill yourself if it is:

  • A small amount, such as that in a thermometer (this volume is about the size of a pencil eraser).
  • In a small area and has not been spread around.
  • On a smooth, hard, surface, e.g. tile, linoleum or wood.
  • On a small, porous item, such as an area rug, that can be thrown away.  Find out whether your home insurance policy will cover the costs of cleanup or items discarded because they were contaminated with mercury.

Spill Cleanup Kits

Some local companies have mercury spill kits for sale. Check the phone book or on the internet for other companies that offer mercury spill kits.

If You Decide You Can Clean Up the Spill Yourself

Protect yourself

Before beginning the clean up a mercury spill:

  • Change into old clothing and shoes that you can dispose of if they become   contaminated.
  • Remove all jewelry because mercury can adhere to metal.
  • Put on gloves, preferably rubber gloves.

Assemble your cleanup supplies

Obtain a mercury spill cleanup kit or collect the supplies listed below.

  • Gloves, preferably rubber
  • Small plastic bags, preferably zipper style
  • Large trash bags
  • Large tray or box
  • Paper towels, napkins, tissues or toilet paper
  • Duct tape, packing tape, or masking tape
  • Two index cards or stiff paper, cardboard, single-edge razor blades or a rubber squeegee

you may also need:

  • Plastic dustpan
  • Eyedropper
  • Flashlight

Everything contaminated with mercury must be disposed of properly.

Clean up (recover) the mercury

(see following instructions for cleanup on various types of surfaces)

Remove your shoes and clothing

  • Carefully place contaminated shoes and clothing into a trash bag.
  • Avoid touching anything that may have contacted mercury
  • Seal the bag.

Store mercury wastes properly

  • Store out of the reach of children, in a locked cupboard or on a high shelf, until you can dispose of it.
  • Store away from heat and flames.

Wash your hands thoroughly and take a shower immediately after the cleanup

Ventilate the area to the outdoors for at least two days after the cleanup

Open windows and exterior doors for at least two days, if possible, and use fans to push contaminated air out. In winter, shut off the room by closing the door and sealing any cracks around it. Then, open a window and run a fan in that room for a couple of days.

Properly dispose of the mercury and mercury-contaminated items

(See the section on Proper disposal.)

If you have health concerns, call a physician

  • Urine and blood tests can measure mercury levels in the body; hair tests can give a history of exposure.
  • Mercury vapor badges can measure the amount of mercury in the air.

Cleanup On Various Types of Surfaces

Cleanup on hard surfaces (countertops, linoleum or tile)

1. Collect the glass (from the broken thermometer or other device):

  • Place pieces of glass on a paper towel.
  • Fold the paper towel, enclosing the glass shards, and place it in a plastic bag and seal.
  • Label the bag Mercury Waste: Hazardous.

2. Collect the mercury:

  • Push the beads of mercury together using two razor blades or stiff paper or cardboard. Use the flashlight to search for other glass shards and mercury – the light will reflect off the mercury.
  • Pick up the beads of mercury by pushing them into a dustpan or onto a stiff sheet of paper or cardboard. You can also try using an eyedropper to collect beads of mercury.
  • Working over a tray or box, slowly and carefully transfer the mercury into a wide-mouth, screw top container. Put on the lid, seal the lid with tape, and label the jar Mercury:  Hazardous.
  • Place the wide-mouth container (with the liquid mercury) into a plastic bag and seal. Place the bag inside a second plastic bag and seal. Label the outer bag Mercury: Hazardous.
  • Pick up any remaining droplets of mercury and pieces of glass with tape. You can also use a cotton ball or moist paper towel to pick up mercury beads from cracks and crevices. Again use a flashlight to look for mercury droplets in cracks and crevices.
  • Working in a tray or box, place the mercury contaminated tape into a plastic bag and seal.
  • Label the bag Mercury Waste: Hazardous.

Cleanup on carpet

1. When possible, it’s best to cut out the contaminated area of carpet and pad:

  • Fold contaminated piece so mercury is trapped inside.
  • Place the contaminated item and all items used for cleanup in a plastic bag.
  • Place the bag into a second plastic bag and seal the outer bag with tape.
  • Label the outer bag Mercury Waste: Hazardous.

2. If you’re unwilling to cut out the contaminated area:

  • Use cotton balls, moist paper towels, or an eyedropper to pick up the spilled mercury.
  • Place all items used for the cleanup into a plastic bag.
  • Place the bag into a second plastic bag and seal the outer bag with tape.
  • Label the outer bag Mercury Waste: Hazardous.
  • Cleanup on disposable, porous items (rugs or clothing
  • Cut the mercury-contaminated areas out of the item or fold the item so the mercury is trapped inside.
  • Place the contaminated item and all items used for cleanup in a plastic bag.
  • Place the bag into a second plastic bag and seal the outer bag with tape.
  • Label outer bag as Mercury Waste: Hazardous.

Cleanup on large, valuable, porous items

If mercury has been spilled on a large or valuable item, such as a sofa, Oriental rug, or heirloom quilt, you may be able to follow this procedure:

  • Clean the item as much as possible using the techniques described for cleaning mercury from carpet.
  • Remove the item from the home and store it in an unoccupied, warm, ventilated place for several months to allow the mercury to vaporize. Do not put the item in an attached garage.
  • Hire an environmental laboratory to test the item to see whether all the mercury has vaporized.

Cleanup of broken fluorescent and HID (High Intensity Discharge) lamps

  • If the lamp has just been broken, quickly open a window or exterior door and leave the area for 15 to 20 minutes.
  • Follow mercury cleanup instructions for the type of surface to be cleaned.
  • Label the container Mercury Waste: Hazardous.

Proper Disposal

Take these to the household hazardous waste collection site

  • Liquid mercury: Put it in a sturdy, plastic container with a screw cap and label it Mercury: Hazardous.
  • Broken fluorescent and HID lamps
  • Mercury-contaminated soil
  • Shoes and clothing that are visibly contaminated with mercury
  • Mercury cleanup wastes (disposable gloves, glass pieces, cotton balls, trays, paper towels, razor blades, cardboard, tape and any other items used for cleanup that may have contacted mercury)

For information regarding the household hazardous waste program, click here or call the environmental health department office.

Put these items into your regular trash:

  • Shoes and clothing that are not visibly contaminated with mercury
  • Items that have contacted mercury but are not visibly contaminated with mercury if your local household hazardous waste collection site won’t take them (for example, mercury does not adhere to dry paper or cardboard).

Help reduce mercury contamination

Coal-fired power plants emit mercury to the atmosphere. So, using less electricity in your home helps reduce demand for electricity and mercury contamination of the environment.

  • Turn down the furnace and water heater.
  • Install energy-efficient fluorescent lighting.
  • Caulk and weather-strip your home.

For More Information

For help with a mercury spill in your home, check out these other resources online:

You can also contact the city HHW collection facility

ACT (Advanced Chemical Transport)
6137 Edith Blvd NE (on west side of Edith between Montano and Osuna) Google Map
Household Hazardous Waste Hotline: 505-349-5220

Open to the Public on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM and Saturday 8 AM – 3 PM

How Should I Clean-Up a Broken Fluorescent Bulb?

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The following information is recommended by Energy Star, a US Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy Program.

For More Information on Compact Fluorescent Lights

Because compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs contain a small amount of mercury, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends the following clean-up and disposal guideline:

Before Clean-up: Ventilate the Room

  • Have people and pets leave the room, and don't let anyone walk through the breakage area on their way out.
  • Open a window and leave the room for 15 minutes or more.
  • Shut off the central forced-air heating/air conditioning system, if you have one.

Clean-up Steps for Hard Surfaces

  • Carefully scoop up glass fragments and powder using stiff paper or cardboard and place them in a glass jar with metal lid (such as a canning jar) or in a sealed plastic bag.
  • Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder.
  • Wipe the area clean with damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes and place them in the glass jar or plastic bag.
  • Do not use a vacuum or broom to clean up the broken bulb on hard surfaces.

Clean-up Steps for Carpeting or Rug

  • Carefully pick up glass fragments and place them in a glass jar with metal lid (such as a canning jar) or in a sealed plastic bag.
  • Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder.
  • If vacuuming is needed after all visible materials are removed, vacuum the area where the bulb was broken.
  • Remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the canister), and put the bag or vacuum debris in a sealed plastic bag.

Clean-up Steps for Clothing, Bedding, etc.

  • If clothing or bedding materials come in direct contact with broken glass or mercury-containing powder from inside the bulb that may stick to the fabric, the clothing or bedding should be discarded. Do not wash such clothing or bedding because mercury fragments in the clothing may contaminate the machine and/or pollute sewage.
  • You can, however, wash clothing or other materials that have been exposed to the mercury vapor from a broken CFL, such as the clothing you happened to be wearing when you cleaned up the broken CFL, as long as that clothing has not come into direct contact with the materials from the broken bulb.
  • If shoes come into direct contact with broken glass or mercury-containing powder from the bulb, wipe them off with damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes. Place the towels or wipes in a glass jar or plastic bag for disposal.

Disposal of Clean-Up Materials

  • Immediately place all cleanup materials outdoors in a trash container or protected area for the next normal trash pickup.
  • Wash your hands after disposing of the jars or plastic bags containing clean-up materials.

Future Cleaning of Carpeting or Rug: Ventilate the Room During and After Vacuuming

  • The next several times you vacuum, shut off the central forced-air heating/air conditioning system and open a window prior to vacuuming.
  • Keep the central heating/air conditioning system shut off and the window open for at least 15 minutes after vacuuming is completed.

Smoke Detectors

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May Contain

Ionization detectors may contain very small amount of low level radioactive material.

Safer Alternatives

Several types of smoke detectors are available for home use.  These Smoke Detectorinclude ionization detectors and photoelectric detectors.  An ionization detector uses a small disk of radioactive material to detect particles emitted by combustion.  A photoelectric detector uses a photo-sensor and light beam to detect smoke.  A particular smoke detector technology may only detect certain types of fires.  For more information about how detectors work, and the correct applications and sensitivities of ionization detectors vs. photoelectric detectors, see the EPA Web site on Smoke Detectors and Radiation.

Handling

Do not crush smoke detector.

Disposal

  • The City Household Hazardous Waste Center does not accept Smoke Detectors.
  • Federal law allows disposal of Household Hazardous Waste like smoke detectors in the trash. It is recommended you to return the product back to the manufacturer.  They are mandated by the Nuclear Regulatory law 10 CFR 32.27 to see that radioactive waste is disposed at a nuclear waste disposal facility.
  • When sending back a smoke detector, you should NOT take it apart. The entire smoke detector needs to be returned to the manufacturer or shipped by UPS ground mail (not airmail). The batteries, however, should be removed and properly disposed of or recycled. No special shipping is needed for your smoke detector: just put it in a box, maybe with some newspaper for padding, and send it.
  • If unable to return smoke detector to manufacturer, remove battery from smoke detector and dispose of smoke detector in the garbage if no other options exist.

For more information contact the Albuquerque Environmental Health Department @ 768-2738

Automotive Fluid Recycling Program Collection Sites

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[Printable PDF]

All sites accept from "do-it-yourselfers" (diy) oil. Green sites also accept from diy antifreeze.

Find the site nearest your location.

Interested Citizens may want to contact individual facilities for the requirements to drop off oil for recycling.

* = accepts antifreeze and waste oil

The businesses below voluntarily provide this service at no charge to the City. Interested Citizens may want to contact individual facilities for the requirements to drop off oil or antifreeze for recycling

Business NameAddressZipPhone
Northeast
AutoZone #2249
8820 Montgomery NE 87111 296-3683
AutoZone #2504
4909 Central Ave. NW 87105 836-0100
AutoZone #2506
11205 Candelaria Rd. NE 87112 299-7787
AutoZone #2508
4213 San Mateo Blvd. NE 87110 884-8826
AutoZone #2533
10121 Central NE 87121 294-0225
AutoZone #3407
12904 Lomas NE 87112 298-1720
AutoZone #3408
8140 Lousiana NE 87113 796-0398
Checker Auto Parts #1707
3920 San Mateo Blvd. NE 87110 883-1909
Checker Auto Parts #852
2220 Juan Tabo Blvd. NE 87112 296-3044
*Jeff's Gasoline Alley (will test antifreeze before accepting) 138 Tennessee NE 87108 262-0411
*Jiffy Lube #1177 2301 Wyoming Blvd. NE 87112 299-1109
*Jiffy Lube #1399
1600 Juan Tabo Blvd. NE 87112 294-7770
Jiffy Lube #1456
4100 Pennsylvania Ave. NE 87109 298-7115
Jiffy Lube #3164
4220 San Mateo Blvd. NE 87110 881-8219
*Jiffy Lube #3165
7200 San Antonio Dr. NE 87109 857-0905
*Jiffy Lube #3166
10508 Menaul Blvd. NE 87112 298-3591
Jiffy Lube #3169
4802 Lomas Blvd. NE 87110 268-7653
Jiffy Lube #969
1201 San Mateo Blvd. NE 87110 266-4603
*Jiffy Lube #970
3640 Eubank Blvd. NE 87111 293-5721
Jiffy Lube #971
6301 Lomas Blvd. NE 87110 262-1082
Pep Boys Manny Moe & Jack 5651 San Mateo Blvd. NE 87109 881-8101
Pep Boys Manny Moe & Jack 1308 Juan Tabo Blvd. NE 87110 292-7111
*Shell Rapid Lube 3601 Wyoming Blvd. NE 87111 298-1556
*Valvoline Instant Oil Change 5223 San Mateo Blvd. NE 87109 883-9090
*Valvoline Instant Oil Change 6417 Menaul Blvd. NE 87110 888-0000
*Valvoline Instant Oil Change 1101 Juan Tabo Blvd. NE 87112 275-2020
*Valvoline Instant Oil Change 9801 Montgomery Blvd. NE 87111 298-0002
Walmart Automotive Center 2701 Carlisle Blvd. NE 87110 884-7020
Northwest
AutoZone #2503
3526 4th St. NW 87107 345-3700
AutoZone #3406
5700 Quail NW 87120
352-1236
AutoZone #3411
4300 Montano NW 87120 792-3369
Checker Auto Parts #1621
501 Coors Blvd. NW 87121 839-4221
Checker Auto Parts #1716
3721 Hwy. 528 (Alameda) NW 87114 890-8466
Checker Auto Parts #4252
6001 Winterhaven, Suite 100 87120 899-5360
Checker Auto Parts #859
416 Candelaria Rd. NW 87107 345-9663
CPR Automotive Repair
6345 2nd St. NW 87107 342-1998
*Don Brown's Auto Service 6001 4th St. NW 87107 345-0085
Jiffy Lube #1736
2400 Rio Rancho Blvd. NW 87124 890-4320
Jiffy Lube #1737
2915 Coors Blvd. NW 87120 831-6210
*Jiffy Lube #1754
151 Alameda Rd. NW 87114 897-7841
Jiffy Lube #2951
9386 Coors Blvd. NW 87114 831-6210
Jiffy Lube #3161
5701 4th St. NW 87107 345-6862
Jiffy Lube #3162
3540 Coors Blvd. NW 87120 839-0302
*Jiffy Lube #3163
3601 NM 528 (Alameda) NW 87114 897-2234
*Pep Boys Manny Moe & Jack 4523 Central Ave. NW 87105 836-0163
*Pep Boys Manny Moe & Jack 1624 Alameda Blvd. NW 87114 898-2258
*Valvoline Instant Oil Change 9501 Golf Course Road NW 87114 899-4171
*Valvoline Instant Oil Change 5801-A Coors NW 87120 898-4000
Walmart Automotive Center Cottonwood Mall 10224 Coors By-Pass NW 87114 898-8497
Southeast
AutoZone #2511
5900 Central Ave. SE 87108 266-6366
Checker Auto Parts #1031
5820 Central Ave. SE 87108 266-4774
Checker Auto Parts #1463
10030 Central Ave. SE 87123 332-9132
Envirosolve Waste Services ($30 minimum charge) 5338 Williams St. SE 87105 873-0964
Jiffy Lube #1938
5812 Gibson Blvd. SE 87108 266-6414
Pep Boys Manny Moe & Jack 5600 Central Ave. SE 87108 266-0036
Valvoline Instant Oil Change 13440 Wenonah Ave. SE 87123 332-4275
Southwest
*AutoZone #2522
2627 Isleta Blvd. SW 87105 873-9099
AutoZone #3402
507 Bridge Blvd SW 87102 243-0415
Checker Auto Parts #1099
1415 Bridge Blvd. SW 87105 766-9831
Checker Auto Parts #1358
3613 Isleta Blvd. SW 87105 452-8902
D & M Shamrock 1906 Isleta Blvd. SW 87105 873-2336
*Perfection Automotive 6120 Coors Blvd. SW 87121 877-6182

Propane Gas Tank Disposal

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Propane gas cylinders are used to fuel items including gas grills, torches, and camping equipment such as stoves, lanterns, and heaters. Propane cylinders are either single-use or refillable.

Propane is flammable and explosive. Do not put a propane tank in the garbage.

An empty tank still contains a small amount of propane gas, and may explode in a garbage truck or when the garbage is processed. Propane tanks in garbage are a safety hazard to people and can damage equipment.

Most scrap metal yards will not accept intact propane tanks, even if they are empty.

Take unusable or unwanted propane tanks (single-use or refillable) to a propane marketer, pressurized gas retailer, or gas service company.

Propane disposal links:

  • Earth 911 article: Propane in the Neck
  • Propane Tank Disposal 101
  • Blue Rhino Recycle Program
  • Propane Safety Information

Local companies that will accept 20-pound refillable Propane Cylinders for disposal

(as of October 2008)

(EHD recommends contacting the company prior to drop-off of cylinder)

Company NameAddressCityZip CodePhone
AmeriGas 4120 Broadway Blvd. SE Albuquerque 87105 877-1010
R&L Enterprise 14305 Central Ave NW (Exit 149 off I-40 (Paseo del Volcan), 1 mi west on N. Frontage Rd, located in RV park) Albuquerque 87121 836-4772

For more information contact the Albuquerque Environmental Health Department at (505) 768-2738.

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